Friday, March 20, 2015

Big Soda and the Open Truth Now Campaign

Full disclosure: I drink soda every now and then, and I really like it! Sometimes I even sip on soda to calm an upset stomach. But knowing it is unhealthy, I try to limit my intake.

Recently, on my morning Bart commute, I have been seeing signs like this one, which reads, "Big Soda says open happiness. What's happy about diabetes?"

Image Source: https://www.facebook.com/opentruthnow

The Open Truth Now campaign, led by Youth Speaks Inc. and UC San Francisco's Center for Vulnerable Populations at San Francisco General Hospital, is riding on the heels of Berkeley's historic passage of a one-cent-per-ounce soda tax to keep the anti-soda train going.

The soda tax passed in Berkeley with a wide margin, despite millions spent by the beverage industry to prevent it, while a similar two-cent-per-ounce tax measure lost in San Francisco (with 55% of voters in favor, not enough for the 2/3 margin the measure required). While public health supporters of the measures pointed to evidence that even a small tax changes behavior (more than education typically does), many opponents felt the tax was an example of ineffective overreach by an overly controlling "nanny state."

The Open Truth campaign is now tackling the issue from a direction that many opponents to the law advocated - reaching not for our wallets but for our brains, by educating the public about critical media consumption and the health consequences of sugar intake.


Image source: http://www.opentruthnow.org

According to Dr. Dean Schillinger, "Americans' sugar consumption has tripled over the past 50 years. And sugary drinks are now the No. 1 source of calories in the American diet — and a major contributor to Type 2 diabetes. Just one 12-ounce soda has about nine teaspoons of sugar — more than the recommended daily maximum for adults and more than three times the daily maximum for kids. Just one to two sugary drinks a day increases risk for Type 2 diabetes by 26 percent."

The ads seen around San Francisco focus on youth and aim to expose the marketing practices that companies have used to target youth of color in particular. The posters allude to the serious increase in diabetes prevalence in recent years, pointing out that the happiness promised by advertisements has actually led to a scourge of illness in many communities.

In many ways, the message of these ads reminds me of the most effective anti-tobacco ads of several years ago, which I wrote about in an earlier post:




You can follow the Open Truth Now campaign on Facebook here:
https://www.facebook.com/opentruthnow

What do you think? Is education, taxation, or both the best way to limit unhealthy consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages? Will the Open Truth Now campaign make a difference?

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