Friday, February 21, 2014

Smoking Policies

For whatever reason, smoking has been the topic of many conversations, viral videos, and policies popping up in my life lately, and I wanted to share some of the interesting things that have been coming up. Feel free to leave a comment letting me know what you think about any or all of these issues!

Berkeley Campus Smoking Ban

U.C. Berkeley recently became a smoke-free campus, meaning that you have to physically leave campus to smoke a cigarette. My prior workplace implemented a similar policy during my first year there, while at the same time offering increased smoking cessation support. As an asthmatic with lots of allergies who does not smoke, I personally feel in favor of the ban. Cigarette smoke has often been a trigger for me. 


At the same time, I know that some of my peers have expressed "feeling judged" by the campus administration and fellow students. Whether you believe this judgment is ultimately a bad thing or not, they obviously perceive it as injurious in some way. Having never been a smoker, I cannot say that I personally know how hard it is to quit. Based on what I do understand, however, it seems that for many people, the relaxation associated with smoking, the reflexive association of cigarettes with certain experiences, the reduced appetite that makes weight management easier for some smokers, and especially the addictive power of nicotine, make it difficult for many to stop. In my prior work place, the smoking ban did serve as an added motivation for some people who were on the verge of deciding to quit, and I heard many stories of people who had made the change through smoking cessation programs shortly after the ban went into effect. On the flip side, I also recall that as a result of that smoking ban, instead of smoking in front of our building, many people simply crossed the street and smoked in front of other businesses, thus exposing other employees and customers to more second hand smoke. And since our company no longer provided ash trays on site, many people threw their cigarette butts in the street outside of said other businesses. Suffice it to say, we received some complaints. I am not sure if this will be the case near our campus or not. It seems that only time will tell. All in all, I appreciate and support the policy, but I recognize that for some, it remains controversial.

City of Berkeley Residential Smoking Bans

Then there have been even more controversial smoking bans, such as the City of Berkeley's law against smoking in apartments or condos, where neighbors may presumably suffer the effects of second hand smoke. And more recently, there is a more restrictive proposal on the table to ban smoking inside single family homes where children, seniors, or lodgers are present. (I'm not sure what the law says about seniors who are smokers.) When I first learned of the latest proposal, I felt outraged at the heavy-handedness and immediately concluded it was going too far. But after sitting on it for a couple months, I cannot help but wonder why I jump to so adamantly defend the "right" to expose others to potent known toxins, including allowing a person to expose their kids, just because they are their kids. We do have plenty of laws in place mandating that you send your kids to school, seek medical care when your child has a serious illness, and do not abuse your child, so it is not as if our society as a whole believes parents can simply raise their kids in literally any fashion. While these cigarette laws are certainly paternalistic, I believe there is room for debate about where we draw the line between necessary paternalism and going too far, especially when it comes to exposing kids to things we know to be poisonous carcinogens. Right now, I find myself in the void on this particular issue and still trying to make up my mind.

Hiring Practices

Also related to the topic of smoking, I recently had a conversation about employers who do not hire smokers at all (e.g. Cleveland Clinic). On the one hand, I always found it hypocritical for healthcare professionals to smoke while telling their patients to quit. On the other hand, as a general hiring policy, one could argue that this is discriminatory, especially as we were discussing whether this standard might be applied to other fields not directly related to health. The other people with whom I was discussing the policy emphasized that smoking is a choice, unlike many other personal characteristics that should not be used as reasons for not hiring. I am personally not swayed to their side and will cautiously say that I still see this policy as discriminatory. However, I was clearly in the minority in the discussion I was having, and I am open to having my opinion changed by a compelling argument in future.

CVS to Stop Selling Cigarettes

CVS Caremark recently announced that it will stop selling cigarettes in retail locations by October 14. The CEO stated, "The sale of tobacco products is inconsistent with our purpose." (See this article on the CVS site.) As pharmacies are playing a greater role in not only dispensing drugs, but also providing a certain level of patient care (such as walk-in clinic sites), it seems to be even more off-mission to continue to sell a product known to cause so many illnesses and deaths. CVS Caremark specifically is branding itself as a "pharmacy innovation company" that is "working to make health care better." According to their website, they also aim to exercise ethics, abide by principles of corporate social responsibility, and influence health policy. With regards to this latest decision, I have to say that I am impressed at their willingness to lose a portion of their revenue to maintain integrity. Bold move, CVS Caremark. Bold move!


In my next post, I plan to share about some interesting anti-smoking commercials, both old and new. In the meantime, what do you think about the above policies? Which ones are good ideas and which ones go too far?

No comments:

Post a Comment